We recently came back from our annual New Years trip to a water park in the Wisconsin Dells. Our family usually celebrates Christmas there.

Our oldest grandson (age 8) received from us one of those slick NERF rifles that look a lot like a sci-fi advanced weapon system. He was and is thrilled with the gift. He spent some time knocking down aluminum cans and became quite good at it. He was also schooled in “gun safety” meaning no ambushing your little brother or sister. (For those of you ignorant of NERF ammo understand it is harmless.)

I’ve been aware for some time the left’s agenda to ban “war toys.” The ban would include everything from toy soldiers and plastic tanks to toy guns whether they be squirt guns or NERF type guns. It was no surprise to read of yet another effort on Townhall to do away with toy guns because they are suposedly dangerous.

According to the Townhall article the agenda suggests that if a child is deprived of a toy gun they will be less likely to be interested in obtaining a real one once they are older. Therefore, they will be less likely to use a gun in acts of violence. As we have seen time and time again every time there is mass shooting the gun is blamed along with the NRA because the NRA stands for the Second Amendment and the right of the citizen to bear arms.

The article compares the argument against toy guns to the argument for open borders. The left insists that open borders are not dangerous; but toy guns are. Logic and common sense have never stood in the way of a left-wing agenda.

This is the picture used to accompany the article. The girls are obviously having fun using NERF type toy guns (or squirt guns). Will banning them help the real problem?

What is a Bible believing Christian to make of this? Should Bible believing Christians buy the argument that toy guns are dangerous in the way the left argues? What is the real crux of the issue biblically speaking?

Here’s my take…

First, let us observe that when there is a mass shooting the news media is all over it. I don’t have a problem with that but it can (and usually does) obscure logical (common sense) and theological thinking because of the huge emotional trauma associated with a mass shooting. A left leaning media is quick to exploit the emotional trauma for their own ends. It just “feels right” to blame the gun and the emotional trauma gives the idea weight but little substance.

It should also be noted that rarely if ever, is a shooter characterized as someone doing a very evil act. It’s acknowledged vaguelly of course but usually explained away as mental illness and the person “was sick” in some way as if they had a disease rather than simply being hateful. (Hmmm, isn’t every unrighteous shooting a hate crime?)

The Bible believing Christian should mourn the fact that guns can be used to perpetrate evil. That has been abundantly clear throughout history. Any weapon can be used for evil as well as for good. Police are armed for good as is the military and as long as weapons are used for good (confronting evil) there should not be be a problem.

The main problem, according to Scripture (and I’d argue by simple observation) is human nature.

Wayne Grudem in his excellent volume on politics puts it like this:

A Christian worldview must include that there is a measure of moral evil (what the Bible calls sin) in the heart of every human being who lives on the face of the earth. In addition, the Bible shows that this moral evil in human beings must be defined in comparison to an external standard of right and wrong, a standard that comes not from within the human race but from God himself. This one idea, that human beings are viewed as sinful before the absolute moral standards of the one true God, has immense implications for numerous policy differences between Republicans and Democrats…

Grudem, Wayne. Politics According to the Bible. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. 2010, (pg. 119)

How does Grudem’s biblical definition of moral evil challenge the assumption that banning war toys will result in less violence? Does fewer guns correlate with less violence given the fact that biblically speaking the real problem is the human heart and the measure of human evil that resides in it?

A Bible believing Christian that truly understands the root of the problem would also understand that banning war toys is a superficial solution that does nothing to solve the “evil within.”

While there is much more than could be said I’ll settle for this: Our culture and often times our evangelical church culture looks to blame evil on something outside of ourselves. In this case, it’s guns and\or war toys. The “something” becomes the bad guy, the demon, the evil, or the mental illness rather than our own propensity to do bad things and often horrible things. Frankly, it’s only because of the grace of God that most of us are not as bad as we could be!

The culture as a whole has turned away from God and his absolute standards so we should not be surprised to see the chaos around us. What should surprise us is evangelicals who seem to think that man is basically good and that superficial “solutions” to large problems are the answer.

As for my grandson (and his parents) I’m proud of them. I’m proud that he is being raised as a boy who will all to soon become a man and have man\husband responsibilities. Those responsibilities will be defined by the Bible and Lord willing his little heart will be changed by the gospel so that he strives to fulfill those responsibilities in a way that honors Christ and takes care of his family.

Ultimately, Jesus is the solution to the problems that ails us all. As conservative Protestants we must learn to think biblically about issues. If we don’t we will fall into the trap as the culture in general and either ignore God completely or reduce Him to some abstraction that has little to nothing to say about what really is our biggest problem (Rom 1:18-32).

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